Posts Tagged 'asim'

Ken Hayworth on How to create a Connectome Observatory of the mouse brain and beyond, OpenQwaq, November 13 2011

Ken Hayworth

See A Connectome Observatory for nanoscale brain imaging | KurzweilAI.

Ken Hayworth gave a talk and Q/A on How to create a Connectome Observatory of the mouse brain and beyond, in OpenQwaq, on November 13 2011.

New technologies now permit imaging brain tissue at resolutions approaching 5x5x5nm. voxel size, down to the protein level. “This is more than sufficient resolution to determine all the connectivity and the properties of the synapses that are needed to explain the functionality of the brain circuits,” Ken said.

“In 100 years, if we have the technology to bring someone back, it won’t be in a biological body,” Ken said in a New York Times article last year. “It is these scanning techniques and mind-uploading that, I think, will bring people back. This is a taboo topic in the scientific community. But we have a cure to death right here. Why aren’t we pursuing it?”

In the Q&A, participants compared connectome preservation via the chemical brain preservation techniques proposed by Ken’s Brain Preservation Foundation to cryonics.

“If there was really a concerted effort to develop brain preservation technology, it would be easy to have highly reliable hospital brain preservation procedures ready to go in any hospital before the end of the decade. It is all a matter of will,” Ken said.

There are two videos:

VIDEO 1, recorded by Catarina Lamm – Youtube | Blip.tv | Vimeo
VIDEO 2, recorded by Eugen Leitl – Youtube | Blip.tv | Vimeo

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Suzanne Gildert on Thinking about the hardware of thinking: Can disruptive technologies help us achieve uploading?, Teleplace, 28th November 2010

Suzanne Gildert gave a talk in Teleplace on “Thinking about the hardware of thinking: Can disruptive technologies help us achieve uploading?” on November 28, 2010, at 10am PST (1pm EST, 6pm UK, 7pm continental EU).

Suzanne Gildert in Teleplace

This was a revised version of Suzanne’s talk at TransVision 2010, also inspired by her article on “Building more intelligent machines: Can ‘co-design’ help?” (PDF). See also Suzanne’s previous Teleplace talk on “Quantum Computing: Separating Hope from Hype“.

For those who could not attend we have recorded everything (talk, Q/A and discussion) on video. There are 2 different videos on blip.tv:

VIDEO 1 – 600×400 resolution, 1 hour 4 min
VIDEO A – 600×400 resolution, 1 hour 4 min, taken (mostly) from a fixed point of view by Antoine van de Ven

NOTES: To download the source .mp4 video files from blip.tv, open the “Files and Links” box.

Suzanne Gildert in Teleplace

Thinking about the hardware of thinking: Can disruptive technologies help us achieve uploading?

S. Gildert, Teleplace, 28th November 2010

We are surrounded by devices that rely on general purpose silicon processors, which are mostly very similar in terms of their design. But is this the only possibility? As we begin to run larger and more brain-like emulations, will our current methods of simulating neural networks be enough, even in principle? Why does the brain, with 100 billion neurons, consume less than 30W of power, whilst our attempts to simulate tens of thousands of neurons (for example in the blue brain project) consumes tens of KW? As we wish to run computations faster and more efficiently, we might we need to consider if the design of the hardware that we all take for granted is optimal. In this presentation I will discuss the recent return to a focus upon co-design – that is, designing specialized software algorithms running on specialized hardware, and how this approach may help us create much more powerful applications in the future. As an example, I will discuss some possible ways of running AI algorithms on novel forms of computer hardware, such as superconducting quantum computing processors. These behave entirely differently to our current silicon chips, and help to emphasize just how important disruptive technologies may be to our attempts to build intelligent machines.

This talk is part of the ASIM Expert Series (see carboncopies.org). See also Suzanne’s post and the Event on Facebook.

Suzanne Gildert Dr. Suzanne Gildert is currently working as an Experimental Physicist at D-Wave Systems, Inc. She is involved in the design and testing of large scale superconducting processors for Quantum Computing Applications. Suzanne obtained her PhD and MSci degree from The University of Birmingham UK, focusing on the areas of experimental quantum device physics and superconductivity.

teleXLR8 is a telepresence community for cultural acceleration. We produce online events, featuring first class content and speakers, with the best system for e-learning and collaboration in an online 3D environment: Teleplace. Join teleXLR8 to participate in online talks, seminars, round tables, workshops, debates, full conferences, e-learning courses, and social events… with full immersion telepresence, but without leaving home.

Suzanne Gildert on Thinking about the hardware of thinking: Can disruptive technologies help us achieve uploading?, Teleplace, 28th November 2010, 10am PST

UPDATE: See Suzanne Gildert on Thinking about the hardware of thinking: Can disruptive technologies help us achieve uploading?, Teleplace, 28th November 2010, with pictures and videos.

Suzanne Gildert will give a talk in Teleplace on “Thinking about the hardware of thinking: Can disruptive technologies help us achieve uploading?” on November 28, 2010, at 10am PST (1pm EST, 6pm UK, 7pm continental EU).

Suzanne Gildert in Teleplace

This is a revised version of Suzanne’s talk at TransVision 2010, also inspired by her article on “Building more intelligent machines: Can ‘co-design’ help?” (PDF). See also Suzanne’s previous Teleplace talk on “Quantum Computing: Separating Hope from Hype“.

Max Hodak on Brain-machine interfacing: current work and future directions, Teleplace, October 17

Max Hodak gave an ASIM Expert Series talk in Teleplace on “Brain-machine interfacing: current work and future directions” on Sunday October 17.

Max Hodak in Teleplace

About 30 participants attended the talk and contributed to the discussion with very interesting questions and comments. For those who could not attend we have recorded everything (talk, Q/A and discussion) on video. There are 4 different videos on blip.tv:

VIDEO 1: 600×400 resolution, 57 min
VIDEO 2: 600×400 resolution, 58 min, taken (mostly) from a fixed point of view
VIDEO A: 360×240 resolution, 61 min, recorded by Phillip Galinsky
VIDEO B: 600×400 resolution, 68 min, recorded by Next Dila Dreamhacker

NOTES: To download the source .mp4 video files from blip.tv, open the “Files and Links” box.

Max Hodak in Teleplace

Abstract: Fluid, two-way brain-machine interfacing represents one of the greatest challenges of modern bioengineering. It offers the potential to restore movement and speech to the locked-in, and ultimately allow us as humans to expand far beyond the biological limits we’re encased in now. But, there’s a long road ahead. Today, noninvasive BMIs are largely useless as practical devices and invasive BMIs are critically limited, though progress is being made everyday. Microwire array recording is used all over the world to decode motor intent out of cortex to drive robotic actuators and software controls. Electrical intracortical microstimulation is used to “write” information to the brain, and optogenetic methods promise to make that easier and safer. Monkey models can perform tasks from controlling a walking robot to feeding themselves with a 7-DOF robotic arm. Before we’ll be able to make the jump to humans, biocompatibility of electrodes and limited channel counts are significant hurdles that will need to be crossed. These technologies are still in their infancy, but they’re a huge opportunity in science for those motivated to help bring them through to maturity.

Max Hodak in Teleplace

Max Hodak is a scientist-in-training working on brain-machine interfacing at Duke. He founded Quantios to use computing, machine learning to improve life. American, French dual citizen.

Teleplace is one of the best 3D applications for telework, online meetings, group collaboration, and e-learning in a virtual 3D environment (v-learning).

Max Hodak on Brain-machine interfacing: current work and future directions, Teleplace, October 17, 10am PST

UPDATE: see Max Hodak on Brain-machine interfacing: current work and future directions, Teleplace, October 17, with pictures and full video coverage.

Max Hodak will give an ASIM Expert Series talk in Teleplace on “Brain-machine interfacing: current work and future directions” on Sunday October 17, 2010, at 10am PST (1pm EST, 6pm UK, 7pm CET). Those who already have Teleplace accounts for teleXLR8 can just ahow up at the talk. There are a limited number of seats available for others, please contact Giulio Prisco if you wish to attend.

Abstract: Fluid, two-way brain-machine interfacing represents one of the greatest challenges of modern bioengineering. It offers the potential to restore movement and speech to the locked-in, and ultimately allow us as humans to expand far beyond the biological limits we’re encased in now. But, there’s a long road ahead. Today, noninvasive BMIs are largely useless as practical devices and invasive BMIs are critically limited, though progress is being made everyday. Microwire array recording is used all over the world to decode motor intent out of cortex to drive robotic actuators and software controls. Electrical intracortical microstimulation is used to “write” information to the brain, and optogenetic methods promise to make that easier and safer. Monkey models can perform tasks from controlling a walking robot to feeding themselves with a 7-DOF robotic arm. Before we’ll be able to make the jump to humans, biocompatibility of electrodes and limited channel counts are significant hurdles that will need to be crossed. These technologies are still in their infancy, but they’re a huge opportunity in science for those motivated to help bring them through to maturity.

Max Hodak is a scientist-in-training working on brain-machine interfacing at Duke. He founded Quantios to use computing, machine learning to improve life. American, French dual citizen.

Teleplace is one of the best 3D applications for telework, online meetings, group collaboration, and e-learning in a virtual 3D environment (v-learning). Those who already have Teleplace accounts for teleXLR8 can just ahow up at the talk. There are a limited number of seats available for others, please contact Giulio Prisco if you wish to attend.

Martine Rothblatt on Reconstructing Minds from Software Mindfiles, Teleplace, September 18

Martine Rothblatt gave an ASIM Expert Series talk in Teleplace on “Reconstructing Minds from Software Mindfiles” on Saturday September 18, 2010.

Abstract: “I do think, however, there is a (natural) tendency to way overestimate the importance of copying our brain structure to copying our minds. I think our minds will be uploadable in good enough shape to satisfy most everyone by reconstructing them from information stored in software mindfiles such as diaries, videos, personality inventories, saved google voice conversations, chats, and chatbot conversations. The reconstruction process will be iteratively achieved with AI software designed for this purpose, dubbed mindware.

Martine Rothblatt in Teleplace

Some questions and comments from the audience have been of a philosophical nature and related to preservation of self (whatever that is), but most of those who attended the talk were already prepared to accept that, depending on the amount of information stored and the accuracy of the reconstruction process, the upload copy may be (and feel like) a valid continuation of the original self. The talk and the discussion have been more focused on actual technologies and technical issues: How to extract enough information? How to prove that the information extracted is enough? How to quantify a critical treshold? How to make sure that nothing really important is left behind? How to reconstruct a thinking and feeling mind from a database? Martine gave a detailed presentation of the preliminary implementation of software mindfiles in her twin projects CyBeRev and LifeNaut (similar, but kept separate mainly as a fail-safe measure) and their forthcoming mobile clients and integration with social networks.

See also ASIM Experts series: Reconstructing Minds from Software Mindfiles on carboncopies.org and the discussion in the article MIND and MAN: Getting Mental with Giulio Prisco on H+ Magazine. Martine presented also the short movie Bina48 Robot on YouTube (latest update of the video in the New York Times article).

Martine Rothblatt in Teleplace

Thanks Martine for the great talk and thanks to the (about 25) participants who contributed to the discussion with very interesting questions and comments. For those who could not attend we have recorded everything (talk, Q/A and discussion) on video. There are 4 different videos on blip.tv:

VIDEO 1: 600×400 resolution, 1h 21 min, complete
VIDEO 2: 600×400 resolution, 1h 15 min, taken (mostly) from a fixed point of view by Amara Angelica (first few minutes missing)
VIDEO A: 360×240 resolution, 37 min, recorded by Phillip Galinsky, includes 10 min of informal chat before the talk and the first part of the talk
VIDEO B: 360×240 resolution, 47 min, recorded by Phillip Galinsky, includes the last part of the talk and the Q/A and discussion

NOTES: To download the source .mp4 video files from blip.tv, open the “Files and Links” box.

Martine Rothblatt in Teleplace

About the speaker: Martine Rothblatt is responsible for launching several satellite communications companies including the first nationwide vehicle location system (Geostar, 1983), the first private international spacecom project (PanAmSat, 1984), the first global satellite radio network (WorldSpace, 1990), and the first non-geostationary satellite-to-car broadcasting system (Sirius, 1990). As an attorney-entrepreneur she also was responsible for leading the efforts to obtain worldwide approval, via new international treaties, of satellite orbit/spectrum allocations for space-based navigation services (1987) and for direct-to-person satellite radio transmissions (1992).

In the 1990s, Dr. Rothblatt entered the life sciences field by leading the International Bar Association’s project to develop a draft Human Genome Treaty for the United Nations (submitted in 1999), and by founding a biotechnology company, United Therapeutics (1996). Dr. Rothblatt is the author of books on satellite communications technology (Radiodetermination Satellite Services and Standards, Artech, 1987), gender freedom (Apartheid of Sex, Crown, 1995), genomics (Unzipped Genes, Temple University Press, 1997) and xenotransplantation (Your Life or Mine, Ashgate House, 2003).

In 2004, Rothblatt launched the Terasem Movement, a transhumanist school of thought focused on promoting joy, diversity, and the prospect of technological immortality via personal cyberconsciousness and geoethical nanotechnology. Through a charitable foundation, leaders of this school convene publicly accessible symposia, publish explanatory analyses, conduct demonstration projects, issue grants, and encourage public awareness and adherence to Terasem values and goals. The purpose of the CyBeRev (cybernetic beingness revival) project of the Terasem Movement is to prevent death by preserving sufficient information about a person so that recovery remains possible by foreseeable technology. If CyBeRev people are recoverable in the future, then they were never really dead in the first place. Real death occurs when information about a person become so disorganized that no technology could restore the original state. This is called the information-theoretic criterion for death. Various definitions of death, such as cessation of heartbeat, have been abandoned as technology (such as defibrillators) demonstrated recovery was possible. The LifeNaut project is an alternative implementation of the same core idea. See also Martine’s blog on Mindfiles, Mindware and Mindclones.

Teleplace is one of the best 3D applications for telework, online meetings, group collaboration, and e-learning in a virtual 3D environment (v-learning).

Martine Rothblatt on Reconstructing Minds from Software Mindfiles, Teleplace, September 18, 10am PST

UPDATED – See the report and videos of the talk: Martine Rothblatt on Reconstructing Minds from Software Mindfiles, Teleplace, September 18

Martine Rothblatt will give an ASIM Expert Series talk in Teleplace on “Reconstructing Minds from Software Mindfiles” on Saturday September 18, 2010, at 10am PST (1pm EST, 6pm UK, 7pm CET). Those who already have Teleplace accounts for teleXLR8 can just ahow up at the talk. There are a limited number of seats available for others, please contact Giulio Prisco if you wish to attend.

Martine Rothblatt

Abstract: “I do think, however, there is a (natural) tendency to way overestimate the importance of copying our brain structure to copying our minds. I think our minds will be uploadable in good enough shape to satisfy most everyone by reconstructing them from information stored in software mindfiles such as diaries, videos, personality inventories, saved google voice conversations, chats, and chatbot conversations. The reconstruction process will be iteratively achieved with AI software designed for this purpose, dubbed mindware.

Teleplace is one of the best 3D applications for telework, online meetings, group collaboration, and e-learning in a virtual 3D environment (v-learning). Those who already have Teleplace accounts for teleXLR8 can just ahow up at the talk. There are a limited number of seats available for others, please contact Giulio Prisco if you wish to attend.


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